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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



The project could never have been completed without the assistance of a great many people, who gave freely of their knowledge and talents and provided much-needed support.

First and foremost, we gratefully acknowledge the help and support of the Heritage Education staff at the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, particularly that of Megg Heath and Jeanne Moe. They introduced us to Project Archaeology and encouraged us to prepare a North Carolina version of Intrigue of the Past. Even more importantly, they gave us permission to use their Intrigue as a model for ours, and provided valuable comments on the draft as it evolved. Virtually all the lessons in Parts 1, 2, and 5 are adapted from originals that they and their colleagues developed. Without this foundation to build upon, our task would have been far more difficult. Thanks also go to the Society for American Archaeology and its extraordinary Public Education Committee, for fostering and encouraging our efforts to bring this project to fruition.

Closer to home, archaeologists Trawick Ward and Stephen Davis shared their vast knowledge of North Carolina archaeology and provided valuable help and suggestions at many points along the way. Thanks go, too, to Randy Daniel for a long-ago trip to Morrow Mountain along with updated insights into the Paleoindian past. Numerous other archaeologists and archaeology-education specialists helped in large and small ways by sharing thoughts and information: Stephen Claggett, Joffre Coe, Elaine Davis, Stanley Knick, Mark Mathis, David Moore, David Phelps, Anne Rogers, and Archie Smith.

Members of North Carolina's Native American community gave us help, support and encouragement. Thanks go to the members of the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs, especially to executive director Greg Richardson, staffer Mickey Locklear, and member Lila Spaulding, who chaired the Commission's Education Committee. Special thanks, too, go to board member Ray Littleturtle and his wife Kat, along with Jim Chavis, John and Lynette Jeffries, Zoe Locklear, Derek Lowry, Laura Hill Pinnix, Ruth Revels, and Rosa Winfrey. In Chapel Hill, Danny Bell and Anthony Locklear offered steady words of encouragement.

Staff and students affiliated with UNC-Chapel Hill's School of Education have helped with this project since its inception. The Center for Mathematics and Science Education was (and continues to be) an essential partner in organizing the teacher workshops at which many of these lesson plans were first deployed and refined; we thank Pat Bowers, Lin Dunbar Frye, and Russ Rowlett for being such helpful collaborators. Learn North Carolina, another service unit now based at the school, offered the opportunity to distribute these lesson plans throughout the state by means of their innovative, on-line database for K-12 teachers; we are particularly grateful to Catherine Etheridge, Emily Gibbons, Bobby Hobgood, Phil Kaufman, Anne Parker,and Doug Short for their expertise and support over the years. We also thank students Kim Chaney Bay, Lisa Carboni, Claudia Ceccon, Thomas Parks, and Leslie Wyatt, who worked to develop and improve a number of lesson plans; although not all their lessons made it into this book, their input greatly improved the ones that did.

Our thanks go to the North Carolina elementary and middle-school teachers--Judy Rucker, Dede Gray, Larry Johnson, and Ruby Jones--who commented on the lessons and fit them into the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. We are also grateful to the many teachers who anonymously reviewed our lesson plans prior to their inclusion in the Learn North Carolina database.

Other individuals deserve special thanks for their assistance with the preparation of particular lessons. These are Margaret Scarry and Gayle Fritz for Lesson 2.5, Archie Smith and the education staff at Town Creek Indian Mound for Lesson 2.7, Meredith Poole for Lesson 2.10, Mark Mathis for Lesson 2.11, Joseph Herbert and Jane McManus Eastman for Lesson 3.4, Christopher Rodning and Lily Steponaitis for Lesson 4.5, Thomas Hargrove for Lesson 4.2, Linda Carnes-McNaughton and David Moore for Lesson 5.1, Scott Ashcraft and David Moore for Lessons 5.2 and 5.3, John Jeffries for Lesson 5.5, and Dolores Hall for Lesson 5.5 and Appendix 3. Fiona Clem provided key bibliographic assistance. Tim Jones of the Playmakers Repertory Company supplied props for the "Child's Bedroom" in Lesson 4.5. David Deese, editor of the Stanly News and Press, kindly allowed us to combine and paraphrase two of his articles for use in Lesson 5.5. Michael Caduto and his publisher Fulcrum, Inc. granted permission to reprint "The Coming of Corn" in Lesson 3.4. Chris Hughes drew the colonial coin used in Lesson 1.3. Rebecca Dobbs prepared the maps used in Lessons 4.6 and 4.7. We are also grateful to April Higgins, who provided invaluable advice on design matters and created this book's cover.

Most of the illustrations in this book were produced by the staff of the Research Laboratories of Archaeology; some were made specifically for this book while others were drawn from our files. Many illustrations were also directly adapted from previous versions of Intrigue of the Past, with the gracious permission of the Bureau of Land Management. We are also grateful to the University of North Carolina Press for allowing us to reuse or adapt illustrations that have appeared in their books; although these instances are not always credited individually, the books in which they appeared are generally listed among the sources at the end of each lesson plan.

Special thanks go to Thomas Maher, who held our hand through countless computer problems and maintained his good humor and patience with our technology-related questions. Sharon Riley prepared the initial electronic versions of these lesson plans for distribution via the World Wide Web, and helped with countless other technology issues. Christopher Rodning provided crucial technical help in creating the final electronic versions. Brenda Moore, secretary of the Research Laboratories of Archaeology, provided valuable and unstinting clerical support. Special thanks also go to Dr. John Florin, who, as chair of the Geography Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, donated a quiet space, a computer, paper, phone access, and a cartographer just because, as a member of the university community, he believed in what we were doing.

Finally, we gratefully acknowledge the generous funding received from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, the North Carolina Archaeological Society, and T. Lewis Hooper, without which this book would never have come into existence. A Blackwell Fellowship at UNC's Institute for the Arts and Humanities gave one of us (VPS) the time to edit the final manuscript. We also thank UNC's College of Arts and Sciences and the Arts and Sciences Foundation for their valuable support.


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