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Appendix 2
SELECTED READINGS



North Carolina Archaeology

Coe, Joffre L. 1964. The Formative Cultures of the Carolina Piedmont. Transactions 54(5). Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.

Coe, Joffre L. 1995. Town Creek Indian Mound: A Native American Legacy. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Daniel, I. Randolph. 1998. Hardaway Revisited: Early Archaic Settlement in the Southeast. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Patrick C. Livingood, H. Trawick Ward, and Vincas P. Steponaitis, eds. 1998. Excavating Occaneechi Town: Archaeology of an Eighteenth-Century Indian Village in North Carolina. CD-ROM. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Dickens, Roy S., Jr. 1976. Cherokee Prehistory: The Pisgah Phase in the Appalachian Summit Region. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Keel, Bennie C. 1976. Cherokee Archaeology: A Study of the Appalachian Summit. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Mathis, Mark A., and Jeffrey J. Crow, eds. 1983. The Prehistory of North Carolina: An Archaeological Symposium. Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archives and History.

Ward, H. Trawick, and R. P. Stephen Davis, Jr. 1999. Time Before History: The Archaeology of North Carolina. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Ward, Trawick, and R. P. Stephen Davis, Jr. 1993. Indian Communities on the North Carolina Piedmont, AD 1000 to 1700. Monograph Series 2. Chapel Hill: Research Laboratories of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.



North Carolina Indians

Boyce, Douglas W. 1978. "Iroquoian Tribes of the Virginia--North Carolina Coastal Plain." In Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. 15, Northeast, edited by Bruce Trigger, pp. 282-289. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution.

Dial, Adolf L. 1993. The Lumbee. New York: Chelsea House.

Feest, Christian F. 1978. "North Carolina Algonquians." In Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. 15, Northeast, edited by Bruce Trigger, pp. 271-281. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution.

Hulton, Paul. 1984. America 1585: The Complete Drawings of John White. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Lawson, John. 1967 [orig. 1709]. A New Voyage to Carolina, edited by Hugh Talmage Lefler. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Lerch, Patricia Barker. 1992. "State-Recognized Indians of North Carolina, Including a History of the Waccamaw Sioux." In Indians of the Southeastern United States in the Late 20th Century, edited by J. Anthony Paredes, pp. 44-71. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

Merrell, James H. 1989. The Catawbas. New York: Chelsea House.

Perdue, Theda. 1985. Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina. Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archives and History.

Perdue, Theda. 1989. The Cherokee. New York: Chelsea House.

Quinn, David Beers, ed. 1991. The Roanoke Voyages: 1584-1590. 2 vols. Reprint of 1955 edition published by the Hakluyt Society, London. New York: Dover.

Rights, Douglas L. 1988 [orig. 1947]. The American Indian in North Carolina. Winston-Salem: John F. Blair.

Ross, Thomas E. 1999. American Indians in North Carolina: Geographic Interpretations. Southern Pines, N.C.: Karo Hollow Press.

South, Stanley A. 1959. Indians in North Carolina. Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archives and History.

Wetmore, Ruth Y. 1975. First on the Land: The North Carolina Indians. Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair.



Archaeology and Indians of Neighboring States

Bense, Judith A. 1994. Archaeology of the Southeastern United States: Paleoindian to World War I. San Diego: Academic Press.

Chapman, Jefferson. 1994. Tellico Archaeology: 12,000 Years of Native American History. Revised ed. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Culberson, Linda Crawford. 1993. Arrowheads and Spear Points in the Prehistoric Southeast. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Egloff, Keith, and Deborah Woodward. 1992. First People: The Early Indians of Virginia. Richmond: Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

Goodyear, Albert C., III, and Glen T. Hanson. 1989. Studies in South Carolina Archaeology. Anthropological Studies 9. Columbia: South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina.

Goodyear, Albert C., III, James L. Michie, and Tommy Charles. 1990. The Earliest South Carolinians: The Paleoindian Occupation of South Carolina. Occasional Papers 2. Columbia: Archaeological Society of South Carolina.

Hudson, Charles. 1976. The Southeastern Indians. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.

Justice, Noel D.1987. Stone Age Spear and Arrow Points of the Midcontinental and Eastern United States: A Modern Survey and Reference. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

O'Connor, Mallory McCane. 1995. Lost Cities of the Ancient Southeast. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.



General Sources on Archaeology

Deetz, James. 1967. Invitation to Archaeology. Garden City, N.Y.: Natural History Press.

Joukowsky, Martha. 1980. A Complete Manual of Field Archaeology: Tools and Techniques of Field Work for Archaeologists. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

Fagan, Brian M. 1978. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology. 3rd ed. Boston: Little Brown.

Stuart, George E., and Francis P. McManamon. 1996. Archaeology and You. Washington, D.C.: Society for American Archaeology.

Thomas, David Hurst. 1994. Exploring Ancient Native America. New York: Macmillan.



Suitable for Young Readers

Claro, Nicole. 1992. The Cherokee Indians. New York: Chelsea House.

Dickens, Roy S., Jr., and James L. McKinley. 1979. Frontiers in the Soil: The Archaeology of Georgia. LaGrange, Ga.: Frontiers Publishing.

Edmonds, Susan. 1993. Native Peoples of North America: Diversity and Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hackwell, W. John. 1986. Digging to the Past: Excavations in Ancient Lands. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.

Henderson, A. Gwynn. 1992. Kentuckians Before Boone. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

James, Carollyn. 1990. Digging up the Past. New York: Franklin Watts.

Lepthien, Emilie U. 1985. The Cherokee. Chicago: Childrens Press.

Potter, Eloise F., and John B. Funderburg. 1986. Native Americans: The People and How They Lived. Raleigh: North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences.

Samford, Patricia, and David Ribblett. 1995. Archaeology for Young Explorers: Uncovering History at Colonial Williamsburg. Williamsburg, Va.: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Stein, R. Conrad. 1993. The Trail of Tears. Chicago: Childrens Press.



World Wide Web Resources: General Archaeology

American Anthropological Association.
<www.aaanet.org>. Home page of the major professional organization of anthropologists. Contains links to many web sites of archaeological interest.

Archaeological Institute of America.
<www.archaeological.org>. Home page of an organization devoted principally to the archaeology of the Mediterranean region. Contains both information and links of interest to teachers.

ArchNet, World Wide Web Virtual Library of Archaeology.
<archnet.uconn.edu>. This site, based at the University of Connecticut, is by far the most comprehensive guide to archaeological content on the web.

Learn North Carolina.
<www.learnnc.org>. A comprehensive web resource for K-12 teachers across North Carolina. One of its many features is a database of lesson plans keyed to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Most of the lesson plans in the current edition of Intrigue of the Past: North Carolina's First Peoples are available in this database. As these lesson plans are refined and as new lesson plans are written, the most up-to-date versions will be available on this site. The site is based at the School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

National Park Service, Links to the Past.
<www.cr.nps.gov>. An excellent portal to all sorts of historical and archaeological topics, not limited to national parks.

Society for American Archaeology.
<www.saa.org>. Home page of the largest professional organization of archaeologists in the United States. Note especially the links under "Education" and "Publications."

Society for Historical Archaeology.
<www.sha.org>. Home page of a professional organization of archaeologists who study more recent, historically documented periods. The site contains general information on archaeology of interest to teachers.



World Wide Web Resources: North Carolina Archaeology

Archaeology and Ancient History of North Carolina.
<www.learnnc.org/learnnc/resources/anthro2.nsf>. A web resource on North Carolina archaeology designed especially for K-12 students and teachers. It is maintained by Learn North Carolina, a program for teachers based at the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

North Carolina Archaeology.
<www.arch.dcr.state.nc.us>. This site is the most comprehensive guide to archaeology and archaeologists in North Carolina. It is maintained by the Office of State Archaeology, a branch in the Division of Archives and History.

North Carolina Archaeological Society.
<www.arch.dcr.state.nc.us/ncas.htm>. This is a membership organization of people interested in North Carolina archaeology, with local chapters across the state.

North Carolina Historic Sites Section, Division of Archives and History.
<www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/default.htm>. This site contains links to state-run historic sites in North Carolina, many of which have archaeological exhibits (such as Town Creek Indian Mound, Historic Halifax, Historic Bath, Brunswick Town, Fort Dobbs, and Somerset Place).

Research Laboratories of Archaeology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
<rla.unc.edu>. Home page of the oldest research center devoted to North Carolina archaeology. Contains information and links of interest to teachers, including a web version of this book.



World Wide Web Resources: Magazines on Archaeology

American Archaeology.
<www.americanarchaeology.com>. A bimonthly magazine published by the Archaeological Conservancy.

Archaeology.
<www.archaeology.org>. Magazine published by the Archaeological Institute of America. Articles from current and back issues are available here.

Archaeology and Public Education
<www.saa.org/Education/PubEdu/a&pe/index.html>. An internet newsletter on K-12 archaeology education published by the Society for American Archaeology. Articles from current and back issues are available here.

Discovering Archaeology.
<www.discoveringarchaeology.com>. Bimonthly magazine published by Scientific American.


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